Oracle offers free Internet trouble map for finding outages

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There’s no shortage of Internet maps network and security administrators can tap into. They can make an eye-catching wall display on a big-screen monitor, with colourful animation that suggests the globe is awash in trouble.

The latest free map was revealed this week from Oracle, and dubbed the Internet Intelligence Map. Unlike other threat maps which pulse with action, this map is an aggregation of 48 hours worth of data that puts hot spots of colour on countries that have seen Internet disruptions.

The website has two sections

— Country Statistics shows any potential Internet disruptions seen during the previous 48 hours based on three primary measures of Internet connectivity in that country: border gateway protocol routes, traceroutes to responding hosts and DNS queries hitting Oracle servers from that country. Click on one of the orange or red spots on the map and you’ll get this:

Oracle Internet Intelligence Map country statistic graph

— Traffic Shifts shows data caught from traceroutes Oracle runs daily from hundreds of measurement servers around the world. This can be broken down by providers most impacted. A user can then drill down into the provider data for a graphical view, like the one below. If a provider is down there will be a gap in the bars.

Graphic from Oracle Internet Intelligence Map

In a blog Oracle said the traffic shifts tool enumerates the top 100 shifts in the previous 48-hour period, allowing users to explore at a macro-level the connectivity picture for any given autonomous system (AS).

“It’s a  graphical way to get insight into the health of the global Internet.” Kyle York, vice-president of product and strategy for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and general manager for Oracle’s Dyn business unit, which provides domain name server (DNS) and email delivery solutions. “Anybody who’s interested in Internet volatility and performance will gain some insights.”

However, to get real-time data and alerting a customer would have to pay for extra datasets and capabilities.

Want more free maps: Several vendors have them using data from sensors in software their customers buy. Here are just a few:

–The Internet Weather Map, an Open Community Project whose goal is to map and share data on latency and outages. This information can be used by IT administrators to quickly diagnose problems with their own Internet connectivity as seen by email delays, and sluggish browsing.

Internet Latency Map

Akami’s Real Time Web Monitor, which shows the current number of network attacks by state or country), as well as traffic volume.

Akamai”s Real Time Web Monitor

FireEye’s Cyber Threat Map, which looks like countries lobbing missiles at each other. Data is very general, but there’s a lot of action.

FireEye Cyber Threat Map

–Kaspersky’s Cyberthreat Real Time Map  is a slowly spinning globe in the darkness of space, which, like FireEye’s map, gives the impression of broadsides of attacks being fired from everywhere. And there’s lots of interesting charts and data. Mesmerizing.

Kaspersky Cyberthreat Map

–Arbor Networks’ Digital Attack Map has DDoS attack data from up to the previous 48 hours with some general data showing countries by attack source and destination.

Arbor Networks DDoS map

 

 


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